In 2015, the Australian women’s soccer team would have received 5,500 dollars if they reached the finals, while the men would have gotten 69,000. Women’s soccer doesn’t differ from men’s soccer by much, but there is still a massive disparity in their pay.

For years, women’s sports have been less respected than men’s. The Atlantic published comments they had on the pay inequality in sports.  Commenters speculate the disparity is because women are “slower” or “weaker.”

A 2019 Statista survey studied the sexes of people who watch sports more than anything else. 76% were male. This percentage could connect to the comments above– men may prefer sports they see as more “on their level.”

But, in that case, women would be watching more women’s sports, something that is untrue. Upon polling 236 people of different genders, 43.64% of people said they watched men’s sports most of the time. 32.2% of people answered a mix, while only 24.15% watched majority women’s. These statistics prove that if men do want something “at their level,” the same doesn’t go for women.

The disproportionate support of women’s and men’s games proves true at Carrboro High School as well. CHS athletic director April Ross said that men’s soccer games had 864 spectators throughout the 2018-19 season. Women’s soccer had 776 attendees.

That said, the unequal distribution of popularity is not as prevalent in individualistic sports. Women’s tennis, figure skating, dance, and gymnastics are equal to, if not more popular than men’s. In the same The Atlantic article, another user commented that those sports all “highlight the different strengths of female athletes.”

This belief is represented in the popularity of these sports: Serena Williams is as highly regarded as Roger Federer. More people can name Misty Copeland than they could a men’s ballerina.

Is the difference in “strengths” of male and female athletes leading to the division? This belief would mean that the strength and aggression of sports is better shown by men, while grace and beauty are better illustrated by women.

But maybe the “strengths” of women and men go back to stereotypes. The majority popular men’s sports (like wrestling and football) display aggression and value brawn. Even sports like wrestling at CHS, advertised as coed, had no women last year. While on the other hand, sports commonly viewed as women’s idealize beauty and poise. 

Coach Ross also said that football games are a social event, and that they’re scheduled for accessibility, at a time when most people can attend.

Perhaps it’s simply tradition–football games are the games that bring dances, and they’re the games presented in media like the biggest deals. In countless movies and TV shows, football games are where the fight goes down, or the break up occurs.

In order for women’s sports to gain more popularity, they need more supporters. Men’s basketball and football are always publicized, while women’s sports games go unnoticed, with very little excitement around them.

For women’s sports to become appreciated, they need people to publicize their games, get people attending. They need to be more appreciated by people outside of the sport, and they need more respect.

In 2015, the Australian women’s soccer team would have received 5,500 dollars if they reached the finals, while the men would have gotten 69,000. Women’s soccer doesn’t differ from men’s soccer by much, but there is still a massive disparity in their pay.

For years, women’s sports have been less respected than men’s. The Atlantic published comments they had on the pay inequality in sports.  Commenters speculate the disparity is because women are “slower” or “weaker.”

A 2019 Statista survey studied the sexes of people who watch sports more than anything else. 76% were male. This percentage could connect to the comments above– men may prefer sports they see as more “on their level.”

But, in that case, women would be watching more women’s sports, something that is untrue. Upon polling 236 people of different genders, 43.64% of people said they watched men’s sports most of the time. 32.2% of people answered a mix, while only 24.15% watched majority women’s. These statistics prove that if men do want something “at their level,” the same doesn’t go for women.

The disproportionate support of women’s and men’s games proves true at Carrboro High School as well. CHS athletic director April Ross said that men’s soccer games had 864 spectators throughout the 2018-19 season. Women’s soccer had 776 attendees.

That said, the unequal distribution of popularity is not as prevalent in individualistic sports. Women’s tennis, figure skating, dance, and gymnastics are equal to, if not more popular than men’s. In the same The Atlantic article, another user commented that those sports all “highlight the different strengths of female athletes.”

This belief is represented in the popularity of these sports: Serena Williams is as highly regarded as Roger Federer. More people can name Misty Copeland than they could a men’s ballerina.

Is the difference in “strengths” of male and female athletes leading to the division? This belief would mean that the strength and aggression of sports is better shown by men, while grace and beauty are better illustrated by women.

But maybe the “strengths” of women and men go back to stereotypes. The majority popular men’s sports (like wrestling and football) display aggression and value brawn. Even sports like wrestling at CHS, advertised as coed, had no women last year. While on the other hand, sports commonly viewed as women’s idealize beauty and poise. 

Coach Ross also said that football games are a social event, and that they’re scheduled for accessibility, at a time when most people can attend.

Perhaps it’s simply tradition–football games are the games that bring dances, and they’re the games presented in media like the biggest deals. In countless movies and TV shows, football games are where the fight goes down, or the break up occurs.

In order for women’s sports to gain more popularity, they need more supporters. Men’s basketball and football are always publicized, while women’s sports games go unnoticed, with very little excitement around them.

For women’s sports to become appreciated, they need people to publicize their games, get people attending. They need to be more appreciated by people outside of the sport, and they need more respect.