Shots Spur Protests

Protests in Charlotte have been continuous since the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott on September 20. Violent protests followed the shooting, leading to 40 police arrests. North Carolina’s governor is implementing a 12:00am curfew for the people who live in Charlotte.

Police officers were in the parking lot of the Village of College Downs apartment complex, looking for someone unrelated to the shooting. They apparently noticed Scott exiting his vehicle with a handgun, then getting back into his car. When the officers approached him, he returned to his vehicle but did not comply with the officers’ requests.

Charlotte police withheld the video footage of Scott’s shooting for fear of disturbing his family. When the footage was released, it did not show Scott holding a handgun or acting aggressively. Officer Brently Vinson, who shot Scott, has been put on paid leave.

While there was no handgun present in the video footage, there have been photos released of a handgun holding Scott’s DNA. There were also photos of a marijuana blunt found at the scene.  

“It is well within your political right to protest, so I don’t think personally as far as any legal consequences there is nothing I could do to stop you.” Said Officer Mayfield when asked about the issues of protests. “As far as I’m concerned, I would just make sure all of you are all safe for one, and two that there weren’t any major incidents where it broke into a fight.”

Angry Charlotte residents flooded the streets. In the first two nights after the shooting, the streets of Charlotte saw vandalism, violence and injuries. After the curfew was put into place, the protesters became more peaceful. Police have since allowed them to stay out after curfew.

The protests started out aggressive, but as the police officers attempted to control the demonstrators, they became peaceful. Police shot tear gas and fired flash grenades at the protestors in order to maintain control.

“I was very upset that such a horrible thing had happened in my city, but the response that the city had was amazing. Overall, most of the protests were peaceful and supported by most of the city.” Aubrey Hill, a high schooler at Ardrey Kell High School in Charlotte, said.

Protests break out in Charlotte. Photo courtesy CNN.com

Posted by Flora Devonport

Flora, the senior staff writer, enjoys the beach and Netflix.